Reviews

¡Fumar, Beber, y Romper!: Introducing Los Nastys And Their Revival of Spanish Punk

by Sofie Vazquez

Two years after the punk rock scene exploded in New York City’s the Bowery, a revolution was emerging in Spain. Finally free from a fascist regime, the Spanish explored and discovered creative subcultures from their newfound independence. With rage, uncertainty but also ecstasy floating in the air, the youth of Spain embraced punk rock music as their outlet to express themselves. Decades later, in modern day Madrid there is the lo-fi, rebellious garage punk band Los Nastys – consisting of singer-guitarist Luis Basilio, guitarist Fran Basilio, bassist Omar Montalvo and drummer Luli Acosta Quintas. Hailing from Madrid’s bustling music scene, Los Nastys are reminiscent of The Stooges, Rancid, and The Clash but stand on their own as a Spanish punk band full of grit, attitude, and an unquenchable thirst for energy.

Musically defiant, Los Nastys are explosive and ferocious. Luis Basilio’s shouted vocals compliment the rangy and jagged guitar-lines, emitting a chaotic but exciting melody. Their music off their debut 2016 album, Cannibal Business, has been described as having a “lot of fight and passion” that’s been kicked to overdrive. Listening to Cannibal Business, tracks such as “Fumar, Beber, Y Romper”, “Madrid Es Un Cementerio” and “No Hay Amor En Las Calles” vividly paint an image of the DIY punk culture of backyard shows running after midnight, teenagers flinging themselves into pits or surfing over other teens, and the reckless fun of completely losing yourself to the music. Although Los Nasty’s attitude is undeniably punk, you cannot miss the underlying bouncy rhythms that evoke a sense to dance. As Luis Basilio grunts about personal or political issues amongst the broken riffs and thrashing cymbals, there is an immediate attraction to the music that keeps your feet off the ground.

Debuting in New York City at The Highline Ballroom for the LAMC Sounds from Spain Showcase, Los Nastys shocked (in a good way) the crowd with their relentless energy soaring across the room. As Los Nastys ripped through their performance, a young Spanish teenager gripped onto the barricade, their body following the rhythm of the guitar, and followed Luis Basilio’s lead as they completely lost themselves to the music of Los Nastys.

 

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